DK-9

     Notes:  Similar in concept to the US Chaparral, the DK-9 is a ground or vehicle-mounted variant of the PL-9 air-to-air missile.  The trailer-mounted version is mounted on a variant of the carriage for the Type 74 37mm AAA gun.  The mount has launchers for four missiles and an IR sensor.  It can be coupled with search radar or IR devices. 

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

DK-9

(Towed Launcher) 1740 kg, (Missile) 115 kg

Average

IR

All-Aspect

(Launcher) $101750, (Missile) $7500

 

Weapon

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

DK-9

2905

500

15000

C51  B70

17C

HE

 

DY-90/TY-90/LY-90

     Notes: These are different designations for the same missile, depending on its method of employment.  DY-90 is its designation when employed on a wheeled ground mount; when mounted on a vehicle, it is the TY-90.  The missile can also be used by an aircraft as an air-to-air missile, in which case it is the LY-90; however, one of the original design goals for the missile was to provide an air-to-air missile for use by helicopters, and it is not employed by fixed-wing aircraft. A naval air defense version was also developed; this is also designated the DY-90. The base designation is the TY-90 (Tian Yan-90, or Sky Swallow 90), and it will be referred to as the TY-90 hereafter in this entry except when necessary for context.  The TY-90 has not yet been exported.  The ground-mount version is further designated the SG-I ADS (Deity Bow Air Defense System).

     The TY-90 uses a 3-kilogram long-rod fragmenting warhead, in which the warhead breaks into titanium cubes upon hitting or exploding within 15 meters of the target (The TY-90 uses a proximity fuze), causing a huge fragmentation effect as well as shredding engines by virtue of the cubes being sucked into the air intakes of the target and possibly wounding or killing the crew.  The cubes can, if a helicopter target is hit right, sever the rotor blades from the target, and Chinese gunner and pilots are taught to target that area.  The ground-mount system is deployed from a wide, flat-bottomed trailer with four wheels; on this mount are four DY-60s, an armored gunnerís cabin, the necessary mechanisms for use, a 10kW diesel-powered APU, and electro-optical sighing systems based on telescopic, 2nd Generation image intensification, and FLIR sensors, as well as a small fire control computer, and a laser rangefinder. Naval versions further use the FLS-1 fire control system, incorporating an 8-kilometer-range tracking radar and an RF-frequency auxiliary tracker, both of which are used to assist the normal dual-band FLIR.  The Naval version also uses a UV tracker, though the Chinese consider the UV tracker very unreliable.  The Naval version is designated the FL-3000N.  The FL-3000N version is larger than the other versions; this is for the most part to provide more propellant, but it also incorporates a slightly larger 3.5-kilogram warhead.

     A new version of the TY-90, DY-90, and LY-90 has been developed, which adds a second stage to the standard TY-90 missile series, is now being developed, to increase the range of the TY-60.  Electro-Optical Systems are being upgraded to take advantage of the longer range.

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

TY-90

(Ground Mount) 261 kg (Missile) 20 kg

Average

IR

All-Angle

(Ground Mount) $225348 (Missile) $4641

FL-3000N

(Missile) 27 kg

Average

IR

All-Angle

(Missile) $4689

TY-90 LR

(Missile) 27 kg

Average

IR

All Angle

(Missile) $4918

 

Weapon

Reload

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

TY-90

2 (One Missile)

2580

600

6000

C12  B50

7C

FRAG-HE

FL-3000N

4 (One Missile)

2320

500

9000

C22  B69

11C

FRAG-HE

TY-90 LR

2 (One Missile)

3009

600

9000

C12  B50

7C

FRAG-HE

 

FN-6

     Notes: The FN-6 (Feinu-6, or Flying Crossbow-6), is the most advanced MANPADS SAM offered by China on the international market.  It is also used in good numbers by the PLA.  The PLA version is designated the HY-6 (HongYing-6).  The FN-6 is known for its use on the Type 07 and 09 tracked antiaircraft vehicles, and the MANPADS version has been seen in use by ISIS in Syria and Iraq. The Free Syrian Army has also been supplied with FN-6s.  (The rumor is that Qater supplied the FN-6s to ISIS.)  Singapore, Malaysia, Sudan, and Peru also use the FN-6, in several forms.  Cambodia, Pakistan and Bangladesh use the FN-16.

     France has accused the Chinese of essentially producing an unlicensed copy of the Mistral in the FN-6.

     The FN-6 uses passive IR guidance, with a digital IR seeker.  The missile has a high resistance to flares, and trying to decoy the missile with flares is two levels more difficult.  The launcher has IFF capability and a clip-on optical telescopic sight. Optionally, an image intensifier or thermal imager may be added to the launcher.

     The FN-16 is an improved version of the FN-6.  Though the FN-6 fires an all-aspect missile, firing at the front aspect with an FN-6 is one level more difficult.  The FN-16 has better all-aspect ability, and does not have the guidance handicap of the FN-6.  Like later versions of the Stinger, the FN-16 incorporates a UV channel into its aiming module.

     The HN-6 is a further development of the FN-16. The fire control system is improved in as-yet unannounced ways, though it is believed to be more accurate than the FY-16.  The missile has a protective cap over the seeker, which is removed before firing.  The HN-6 can be fired from a two-missile station similar to the RBS 70 and Mistral SAMs, except that the front of the gunnerís position has a bullet resistant clear polycarbonate shield.

     The FN-6A is a vehicle-mounted and improved version of the FN-6.  It is usually mounted on a Chinese version of the HMMWV called the EQ2050 HMMWVS, with a one-man turret in the rear.  The turret has eight missiles.  The fire control system is split into two locations on the turret to save space; one portion is under the launcher and another is under the left-side missiles.  The FN-6A is normally accompanied by a vehicle carrying the targeting and surveillance radar.  More information on this vehicle will (eventually) be found on the Chinese Wheeled Antiaircraft pages (just not right now).  In addition to its missiles, the turret mounts a W-85 heavy machinegun.

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

FN-6

(Shoulder Mount) 6.23 kg (Missile) 10.77 kg

Average

IR

All-Angle

(Shoulder Mount) $8150 (Missile) $4538

FN-16

(Shoulder Mount) 6.23 kg (Missile) 10.77 kg

Average

IR

All-Angle

(Shoulder Mount) $8250 (Missile) $4638

HN-6

(Twin Ground Mount ) 24 kg (Missile) 10.77 kg

Easy

IR

All Angle

(Twin Mount) $19202 (Missile) $4938

FN-6A

(Missile) 10.77 kg

Easy

IR

All Angle

(Missile) $4938

 

Weapon

Reload

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

FN-6

2

2015

500

6000

C8  B38

4C

FRAG-HE

FN-16

2

2015

500

6000

C8  B38

4C

FRAG-HE

HN-6

2 (One Missile)

2015

500

6000

C8  B38

4C

FRAG-HE

FN-6A

2 (One Missile)

2015

500

6000

C8  B38

4C

FRAG-HE

 

HN-5

     Notes:  This Chinese MANPADS missile has been widely distributed throughout the world, showing up in places such as North Korea, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, Vietnam, Nicaragua, and many other countries.  It is shoulder fired and has limited capability, but is cheap and readily available.

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

HN-5

(Sight Unit) 4.5 kg, (Missile Unit) 11.5 kg

Difficult

IR

Rear Aspect

(Sight Unit) $3477, (Missile) $10469

 

Weapon

Reload

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

HN-5

1

1300

400

4400

C6  B38

4C

FRAG-HE

 

HQ-2

     Notes:  The HQ-2 is an upgrade of the HQ-1 SAM system (a Chinese copy of the SA-2).  As US ECM and ECCM capability grew, the Chinese realized the need for an almost complete redesign of the HQ-1.  The first version, the HQ-2A, entered service in 1966, and shot down its first enemy aircraft, an American U-2, in September of 1967.  Other users include Iran, North Korea, Albania, and Pakistan.  There have been a number of variants to cope with improving US technology.  The HQ-2 has a secondary surface-to-surface attack capability, including land targets and ships, but it is very inaccurate when used in such a manner.  (There is a tactical ballistic missile variant, the CSS-8, that is not so inaccurate in the surface-to-surface role, but the CSS-8 has no antiaircraft capability.) 

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

HQ-2 Launcher

(Trailer Launcher) 9116 kg

NA

NA

NA

$164117

HQ-2A Missile

2332 kg

Formidable

Radar

All Aspect

$33376

HQ-2B Missile

2332 kg

Difficult

Radar

All Aspect

$33376

HQ-2F Missile

2332 kg

Difficult

Radar

All Aspect

$34192

HQ-2J Missile

2326 kg

Average

Radar

All Aspect

$34168

HQ-2P Missile

2326 kg

Average

Radar

All Aspect

$34128

 

Weapon

Reload

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

HQ-2A

200

6250

7000

35000

C235  B218

68C

FRAG-HE

HQ-2B

200

6250

7000

35000

C235  B218

68C

FRAG-HE

HQ-2F

200

6250

7000

35000

C281  B244

68C

FRAG-HE

HQ-2J

213

6000

7000

34000

C281  B244

68C

FRAG-HE

HQ-2P

213

6000

7000

34000

C329  B262

68C

FRAG-HE

 

HQ-7

     Notes:  This missile system is the result of a technology transfer between France and China.  The HQ-7 system is thus very similar in appearance and technical characteristics to the Crotale.  The complete HQ-7 consists of one or more quadruple missile launchers, several maintenance vehicles, a control vehicle, a mobile generator, and a radar vehicle.  (The launcher statistics below are for the launcher trailer itself.)  The HQ-7 may detect and track its target by one of three methods: radar detection/IR launch/radar intercept; TV detection/IR launch/radar intercept; or manual/optical detection/launch/intercept.  The system can track up to 30 targets and attack two of them at once.  As far as is known, the HQ-7 is used only by the PLA, though there are persistent rumors of imminent sales to Pakistan. 

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

HQ-7 Launcher

(Trailer Launcher) 1152 kg

NA

NA

NA

$162235

FM-80 Missile

84.5 kg

Average

Radar

All Aspect

$24324

FM-90 Missile

84.5 kg

Easy

Radar

All Aspect

$24372

 

Weapon

Reload

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

FM-80

20

3750

500

12000

C34  B80

16C

FRAG-HE

FM-90

20

3750

700

15000

C34  B80

16C

FRAG-HE

 

QW-1

     Notes:  This is the successor to the HN-5 in Chinese service, and has also been sold to countries such as Pakistan, Iran, Iraq, and Yugoslavia, among others.  It has a higher speed, better seeker, and better target aspect capabilities. 

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

QW-1

(Sight Unit) 5 kg, (Missile Unit) 11.5 kg

Average

IR

Side Aspect

(Sight Unit) $3478, (Missile) $12488

 

Weapon

Reload

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

QW-1

1

3000

300

5000

C7  B38

4C

FRAG-HE

 

QW-2

     Notes:  QW-2 is an advanced Chinese MANPADS missile, comparable to the Scorpion or Grappler.  It uses advanced target acquisition and tracking features, and a combination guidance system to resist countermeasures. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The QW-2 was usually issued only to special operations troops due to its short supply, and the only export customers known were Pakistan and Iran, where it was in even shorter supply. 

Weapon

Weight

Accuracy

Guidance

Sensing

Price

QW-2

(Sight Unit) 6.68 kg, (Missile Unit) 11.5 kg

Easy

IR/Radar

All Aspect

(Sight Unit) $34048, (Missile) $16648

 

Weapon

Reload

Speed

Min Rng

Max Rng

Damage

Pen

Type

QW-2

3

3000

200

5000

C8  B38

4C

FRAG-HE