PERSONAL GEAR

 

 

 

Clothing

 

     Animal Skin (Large): A large animal skin draped around you.  If such a skin is not dressed right, the protection it may afford will become a liability, as blood and tissue may freeze or turn.  Dressed properly, and with the right donor animal, it can provide considerable warmth and even some protection against inclement weather.

 

     Animal Skin Clothing: Essentially animal skin that has been tailored into clothing, making it more form-fitting.  This not only makes moving about in it easier, it makes the wearer quieter and increases the amount of cold or inclement weather it can hold at bay.  Again, it must be dressed properly; perhaps even more dressing and perhaps tanning, are necessary for Animal Skin Clothing. Such suits can cost more, depending upon the tailor skill; below should be considered a base cost.  It also includes a hat or hood.

 

     Blanket, Civilian: Warming when dry, virtually useless when wet, as it does not dry easily. This may be made of quilted fabric and filler, wool, linen, or any number of fabrics.  They get wet fast, so don’t use them as outerwear. And then they lose all their warming properties. They can be light or heavy.

 

     Blanket, Fur-Lined:  A simple square or rectangle of fur-lined blanket material, usually bonded with lacings.  It can be used as a ground sheet, or as a wrap.  If you use a civilian blanket as a base, read the notes about civilian blankets.

 

     Blanket, Military: This one of those itchy but surprisingly warm (but not as warm as a poncho liner pound for pound), made of woven wool, but perhaps not in the best way. Water protection is virtually nil, but there is warmth.  Their itchiness is really overblown.

 

     Camouflage Smock: A simple poncho-like smock to provide a makeshift camouflage pattern.  This has an advantage, as it can allow the user to change between camouflage patterns quickly without changing uniforms; the Nazi forces used them quite effectively in World War 2.  It provides almost no protection against weather, as that is not it’s forte. In T2K notes: this may be the primary camouflage garment issued after TDM, as it is easier to make in rear areas.

 

     Civilian Winter Coat: Worn over fatigues, assuming it fits over them. Protects against 30°.

 

     Cold-Weather Gear: This set of clothing is designed to supplement the basic clothing issue for troops that must operate in cold weather. It consists of a hood for the field jacket (issued with fatigues), wool undershirt, insulated canteen covers (to keep your water from freezing outright – it’s still cold enough to give you a jolt), wool underwear (not quite as protecting as milspec long underwear), a sweater, a scarf, a pile cap, a pair of wool gloves with outserts (the gloves can be worn without the outserts, and they will protect against 8 degrees, but they get wet in a hurry and do not dry quickly), liners for the field jacket/fatigues (light and heavy liners) and a pair of insulated boots ("Mickey Mouse Boots"). Various pieces of this setup are worn depending on the individual's taste and the temperature. The weather protection of cold weather gear is primarily in the gear it is worn with. Some items are available alone, and use the stats for those items already listed. The gear is usually issued in camouflage pattern or OD green/OD brown/black, but can sometimes be had in white.  This kit will save your life or stop you from getting frostbite, but can be uncomfortable or downright clumsy if active or worn for a long period of time. (This is particularly true of the gloves with outserts.)

 

     Cold Weather Gear, Extreme: This is intended to supplement the cold-weather gear, instead of being standalone issue.  It consists of a parka, insulating liners for the field jacket, trousers, and poncho, and a pair of mittens and insulating inserts. Only under the coldest conditions will everything be worn. This gear is usually issued in camouflage pattern or OD green, but sometimes can be had in white.

 

     Fatigue Uniform: Part of Basic Issue. The standard fatigue uniform will protect to a certain level; beyond that, you need cold-weather gear, cold weather inserts, or a field jacket, again with or without inserts. This is for the worn uniform; extra carried uniforms and boots require load carried by the carrying personnel.  The fatigue uniform includes boots, 4 pair socks, and a field jacket (without inserts).  Other countries have similar issue, though the camouflage pattern will be one of the nation in question patterns. Some nations have more than one pattern; the pattern worn will be the one applicable to the area of the world they are being deployed.

 

     Field Jacket: Essentially a heavier version of the Fatigues’ shirt, the Field Jacket is made of several layers of fabric and in some cases is weatherized. 

 

     The Light Liner comes with the fatigues and field jacket which fits into the torso buttons inside, over the shoulders, and under the underarm. The fabric is quilted, and is similar to the poncho liner in construction (though not in form).

 

     The Heavy Liner is for the most part made of heavier quilted material. The underarm openings are somewhat more closed, and the Heavy Liner has sleeves which extend under the sleeved portion of the field jacket. (A common use by US and South Korean troops is to wear the liners under the fatigue shirt.)

 

     Gloves, Light: Light leather, synthetic, or wool gloves.

 

     Gloves, Ski: Heavy gloves made of materials such as Gore-Tex. May affect tasks requiring manual dexterity.

 

     Gore-Tex ECWS (Extreme Cold-Weather System): This is the most modern of cold-weather survival, issued to various countries’ on a need-to-have basis. Civilian mountain climbers and arctic explorers will also have such gear. The ECWS consists of Gore-Tex equivalents of the items in the cold-weather and extreme-cold weather gear, but this gear is much more durable, is waterproof, and more resistant to cold than ordinary gear. ECWS is much sought-after by troops who don't have it, and as a result items of the ECWS can be found worn by just about anyone. It can be bought in town, in surplus stores, and in towns downrange who deal in soldier needs. This gear is usually issued in a camouflage pattern, but civilian versions are usually in bright colors (such as orange or blue), and it can be had in white.

 

     Long Underwear: This may be made of lycra, cotton, wool, Gore-Tex, or a variety of materials. It usually consists of a short and underwear, including long sleeves and long leg sleeves.  It does provide considerable warmth, but is often not issued to non-combat-arms troops, who often buy their own long underwear.

 

     Mosquito Net: 2 1/2x2 1/2 meters.  Also known as an Insect Bar, this is just large enough to shield one pup tent, or to make rude shelters from.  They work surprisingly well, but are not often carried by troops due to weight and encumbrance.

                                                                                                                                                                                

     Overwhites: a thin, primarily white with a camouflage pattern (primarily black/gray splotches).  It does not really have any weather protection, and may be a simple smock in some countries instead of an overwhite suit.

 

     Poncho:  A near-square piece oif rubberized or plasticized fabric (or perhaps no fabric at well.  It has a head hole and hood in the center, and snaps to make it fit better around the arms. Mainly keeps you (semi-) dry, but does have some temperature protection.  (As a matter of fact, if the rain stops, it can get downright hot in a poncho,)

 

     Poncho/Shelter Half: This is a more windproof, waterproof shelter half, most famous for being standard issue in the Austrian Army.  It also comes with poles and pegs, sufficient for half a pup tent.  With two such shelter halves, the pup tent is more dry and snug, and used as a poncho, the soldier is more dry and snug in inclement weather.

 

     Poncho Liner: A light quilted blanket.  It is surprising how warm a poncho liner is.  When wet, you can wrap yourself in it, and still get warm, because it dries from the inside out.  It’s not called a poncho liner because you line your poncho with it when using the poncho as rain gear; it called a poncho liner because you can wrap up inside the poncho liner and poncho and make an improvised sleeping bag. It quickly becomes one of an infantryman’s most treasured items.

 

     Poncho/Sleeping Bag: Widely issued to German troops, and issued in small quantities to US troops. Also known as the IMPS (Individual Multi-Purpose Shelter). As it sounds, this is an insulated poncho that can be unfolded and closed off to form a sleeping bag. Small stays keep the other end off the wearer's head and chest if desired. It folds into the hood for carrying.  Weight: 1.4kg; Price: $200 (C/R)

 

     Rainsuit: This is essentially outerwear that is rain-resistant.  It is preferred by many soldiers who like the increased flexibility and quieter travel when in one.  Like the poncho, it can get quite hot when worn in non-inclement weather.  It is for the most part rain gear, but like the poncho has some small value in keeping you a little warm.

 

     Standard Sleeping Bag: This is a standard sort of sleeping bag, like the TA-50 medium bag or any number of civilian or military non-heavy-duty sleeping bags. This bag, or one like it, is issued with MOLLE or TA-50 Gear, and most military units who operate in temperate climes.

 

     Snowsuit: Designed for maximum clothing protection against the elements.  They are usually white, but may also be olive drab (as they are in Korea issue), BDU pattern (probably by now that awful ACU pattern), and several others depending upon the origin of the suit.  They are made to accommodate the fatigue uniform, perhaps with a field jacket.  They are designed for winter attack, possibly on skis or snowshoes.  Further camouflage is given when wearing the oversuit.

 

     Sleeping Bag Bivy Cover, MSB:  This is a waterproof, windproof bag designed to be used with the MSB or by itself.  It incorporates the same material that is used in the Extended Cold-Weather System.  It comes with a breakaway zipper that can completely enclose the occupant and be egressed quickly.

 

     Sleeping Bag, Modular (MSB):  This is a two-bag system consisting of a lightweight outer patrol bag (temperature rated to 30ºF) and an intermediate inner bag (temperature rated to -10ºF).  The bags can be used independently or mated together to form the extreme cold weather bag rated to -30ºF.  The MSB incorporates the latest sleeping bag technology using lightweight polyester fibers for insulation.  It is hydrophobic (water hating) and light, weighing less than 7 pounds.  It comes with a compression sack for easy stowage.

 

     Sweater: Synthetic or wool sweater, probably of civilian make. Could be any of a myriad of colors, construction, and materials.

 

     Thermal Fatigues:  Woolen fatigues for winter use.  Includes socks and boots.

    

     Winter Sleeping Bag, Basic Issue: A standard sort of winter sleeping bag, issued as part of MOLLE or TA-50 Gear.

 

     Wool Undershirt: A heavy overshirt worn under the fatigue shirt or without one if in a field position. It has a button top front and a collar, and is preferred by many instead of the long underwear undershirt.

 

Item

Weight

Volume

Protects Against (Degrees F)

Price

Animal Skin Clothing

3-15 kg

Heavy

10-40

$15-60

Animal Skin (Large)

5-15 kg

Heavy

10-30

$15-45

Blanket, Civilian

2-10 kg

Medium

10-30

$18-30

Blanket, Fur-Lined

10-30 kg

Heavy

20-40

$20-50

Blanket, Military

10 kg

Medium

20

$24

Camouflage Smock

0.25 kg

Light

5

$5

Civilian Winter Coat

3 kg

Medium

30

$300

Cold Weather Gear

9.21 kg

Heavy

99 (Total)

$773

Cold Weather Gear - Field Jacket Hood

0.1 kg

Light

15 (Head); 5 (General)

$30

Cold Weather Gear – Insulated Boots

7 kg

Heavy

50 (Feet); 14 (General)

$171

Cold Weather Gear – Pile Cap

0.12 kg

Light

16 (Head); 6 (General)

$34

Cold Weather Gear - Scarf

0.08 kg

Light

5 (Head); 3 (General)

$21

Cold Weather Gear – Sweater

0.5 kg

Light

20

$67

Cold Weather Gear – Wool Gloves with Outserts

0.16 kg

Light

33 (Hands), 6 (General)

$47

Cold Weather Gear – Wool Underwear

1 kg

Light

30

$67

Cold Weather Gear – Wool Undershirt

0.25 kg

Light

15

$67

Extreme Cold Weather Gear

7.18 kg

Heavy

209 (Total)

$479

Extreme Cold Weather Gear – Field Jacket w/Liner

2 kg

Medium

40 (Liner Only)

$47

Extreme Cold Weather Gear – Mittens w/Inserts

0.18 kg

Light

38 (Hands); 9 (General)

$82

Extreme Cold Weather Gear – Parka

4 kg

Heavy

55

$120

Extreme Cold Weather Gear – Poncho w/Liner

1 kg

Medium

40

$177

Extreme Cold Weather Gear – Trousers w/Liner

1.5 kg

Medium

65

$135

Fatigue Uniform

4 kg

Light

40

$50

Field Jacket

1.5 kg

Medium

20

$60

Field Jacket Light Liner

0.5 kg

Medium

35

$105

Fiend Jacket Heavy Liner

0.75 kg

Medium

45

$135

Gloves, Light

0.2 kg

Light

25 (Hands), 5 (General)

$15

Gloves, Ski

0.5 kg

Light

50 (Hands); 8 (General)

$50

Long Underwear

0.5 kg

Light

35

$105

Mosquito Net

0.5 kg

Medium

0

$10

Overwhites

2 kg

Light

5

$8

Poncho

0.5 kg

Light

5

$12

Poncho/Shelter Half

0.7 kg

Light

7

$18

Poncho Liner

0.75 kg

Light

20

$17

Rainsuit

1.5 kg

Medium

10

$24

Sleeping Bag, Standard

4 kg

Heavy

30

$50

Sleeping Bag, Bivy Cover

1 kg

Light

20

$25

Sleeping Bag, Patrol (Base Bag)

1.1 kg

Light

30

$182

Sleeping Bag, Intermediate Inner Bag

2 kg

Light

20

$100

Sleeping Bag, Heavy Winter

2 kg

Medium

60

$331

Snowsuit

4 kg

Heavy

45

$75

Wool Undershirt

0.35 kg

Light

20

$60

Gore-Tex ECWS

18.85 kg

Heavy

263 (Total)

$1003 (Total)

Gore-Tex ECWS - Field Jacket

1.3 kg

Medium

30

$90

Gore-Tex ECWS - Gloves with Outserts

0.1 kg

Light

40 (Hands); 6 (General)

$71

Gore-Tex ECWS - Insulated Boots

6 kg

Heavy

60 (Feet); 14 (General)

$257

Gore-Tex ECWS - Pile Cap

0.1 kg

Light

18 (Head); 6 (General)

$51

Gore-Tex ECWS - Sweater

0.3 kg

Light

26

$101

Gore-Tex ECWS - Long Underwear

0.4 kg

Light

42

$158

Gore-Tex ECWS - Mittens w/Inserts

0.15 kg

Light

46 (Hands); 11 (General)

$164

Gore-Tex ECWS – Parka

3 kg

Heavy

60

$240

Gore-Tex ECWS - Trousers w/Liner

1.3 kg

Medium

70

$270

Poncho/Sleeping Bag

1.4 kg

Light

20

$200

Sweater, Civilian

0.5 kg

Medium

20

$30

Thermal Fatigues

15 kg

Large

65

$250

 

 

 

Personal Gear

 

     Assault Suit: Special assault equipment intended for use on drug lab raids, hostage rescues, and other similar situations. The suit consists of a set of black fatigues, gloves, a Kevlar helmet (with integral individual tactical radio, a throat mike and bone conduction earphones), a gas mask, tactical web gear and boots. Body armor and personal weapons must be purchased separately.  Luminescent markings (such as "POLICE" or DEA") are usually stenciled on the back and front for quick identification of friend or foe during dimly lit firefights,

 

     Body Veil, Camouflage:  Infrared-defeating body camouflage.  Note that this is NOT a proper Ghillie Suit; the worst sniper’s creation would put one to shame. It is an artificial analogue of a Ghillie Suit. The true sniper does not buy a Ghillie Suits; they are made by the sniper.

 

     Brass Catcher:  Usually made of plastic or cloth (some rare metal brass catchers do exist).  Usually holds 100-200 rounds or links.  Brass catchers do not exist for bolt-action, lever-action, or pump-action weapons, or pistols or revolvers.  In Twilight 2000 terms, these became standard issue to most armies after late 1998, with supplies becoming ever more questionable, to catch those valuable shell casings. 

 

     Can Opener: Such as the US "P38," this is a simple folding wedge of steel, brass, or aluminum. Simple to carry on a dog tag chain or in a pocket; indispensible in many armies.

 

     Canteen, 1-liter: Canteens are not intended to serve as a soldier's only water supply, but they are just that for soldiers on special missions. Because of this, characters may wish to carry two or more. Most are made of plastic, but some few are still made from steel or aluminum.  They include a 1-quart metal drinking cup. Note that fuel cannot be stored in a plastic canteen; the fuel will melt the canteen over time. Though many countries’ MREs come with drink mix, storing this ready-made is not recommended in a plastic canteen, as the drink mix never really washes out completely. Two canteens are a part of most countries’ basic gear setup.

 

     Canteen, 2-liter Reserve: This is a large-capacity reserve water supply, attached to the outside of a field pack or slung on a strap.

 

     Canteen, 5-liter Reserve:  This is a larger reserve water supply, usually carried inside field pack or slung on a strap.

 

     Chaplaincy Logistical Support Package (CLSP): This is a fiberglass or Kevlar box, light yet strong, issued to chaplains and their assistants for field ministry purposes.  The box is about 1x0.75x0.75 meters in size, and contains supplies needed to conduct chaplain's services for about a company-sized element at a time (about 100 troops).  The box contains a laptop computer, about 40 pocket-sized religious books, various papers needed by a chaplain (such as forms for Red Cross support and notification of families of casualties), writing implements, pocket hymnals, sacramental wine, holy water, holy wafers or the equivalent, and the vestments required by the chaplain.  The box functions as a makeshift altar and desk.

 

     Clothing: Most soldiers don't worry about clothing costs; T2K characters are more interested in what clothing is still in one piece. Most troops don't really care how they look on the job, either. (In a special operations environment, this may change.) Walking into an upper-class cocktail party in grimy fatigues is not a good way to convince security that you're supposed to be there.

     However, such “good clothing” may be for fatigues in better than usual condition, boots with decent soles, fatigues with underwear, etc. Under some circumstances, it may mean Class B, Class A, or Dress Uniforms, boots with a glittering shine on them, decorations, etc.

     Prices given are for complete ensembles.

 

     Combat Webbing: Commonly known as Load-Carrying or Load-Bearing Equipment (LBE or LCE), or "kit". Combat webbing consists of a set of suspenders and a web belt (giving rise to another common name, “web gear"), and may consist of any number of other pouches or gear, as follows: This may be TA-50-based, MOLLE, or any of a number of carrying systems; it is a catch-all term.  The LBE is generally free in weight terms, though the GM may impose penalties or weight if he feels the PC has a large amount of equipment carried.

     Suspenders and belt.

     Butt pack: Named for the place it is carried, but can also be carried between the shoulders.

     1-quart canteen and pouch.

     Canteen Cup: Metal cup which fits inside the canteen pouch.

     Personal Medical Kit: Consists of a pouch holding a field dressing, antibiotic powder, alcohol pads, minor pain reliever (aspirin, Tylenol, Aleve, or Advil or equivalent), tweezers, a small pair of scissors, Neosporin or Bacitracin ointment, medical tape, and other such first-aid supplies.  Most soldiers will have other such supplies on their person.

     Rifle Magazine Pouch: Holds 3 magazines.

     Shotshell Pouch: Holds 6 10-Gauge, 12 12-Gauge, 14 20-Gauge, 18 28-Gauge, 27 .410-Gauge, or 12 25mm MM-1 shells. It can also come in the form of loops stitched to a heavy layered backing cloth.

     Pistol Magazine Pouch: Holds 2 magazines.

     Utility Pouch, Small: Holds 0.5 kg.

     Utility Box: Holds 0.5kg. It is generally made of heavy canvas with cardboard sewed inside.

     Holster: Carries most pistols of either NATO or Pact.

     Large Belt Pouch: Usually zippered or closed with snaps. Holds 0.8kg.

          A typical set-up is the suspenders and belt, 2 canteens, one personal medical kit, and two rifle magazine pouches. Other commonly used pieces of military gear are typically made to attach to the belt and suspenders or chest rig.

 

     Cot, Folding: Some older models can be a pain to set up and take down.  Construction is largely of heavy canvas and wood.

 

     Cot, Light Folding: Made of thinner canvas and a lower, lighter aluminum frame.

 

     Duffel Bag: Large canvas sack, usually with carrying straps, and a snap-hook on top to allow for the bag to be locked. Civilian versions are also available, which often have zippered sides and some external pockets. In US Navy and Marines parlance, this is a “sea bag.” Carries 50kg.

 

     Filter Straw: This is a drinking straw-like device that allows one to drink directly from a contaminated source with safety from minerals, parasites, and insect larvae.  They can generally filter about a liter of water, and come in a plasic package that contains the filter within the straw and five additional filters.  Each liter filtered requires another filter, so soldiers are generally careful about how much they drink through the straw.

 

     Flashlight, “4-Battery”: An adjustable flashlight often carried by police and private security guards. It also makes a very effective club.  The name comes the fact that the original flashlights of this type used four D-cell batteries, though today flashlights with three or even two batteries through just as much light.

 

     Flashlight, Krypton: This light is three times as bright as a military flashlight, but uses a special rechargeable lithium-ion battery that lasts only 6 hours.

 

     Flashlight, Military: This is a battery-powered flashlight of rugged construction, such as the US "angle" flashlight.  This flashlight comes with red and blue lenses to allow for use in the dark without letting too much light out and to allow map reading and other such materiel. Every country seems to have a different flashlight it issues to its troops; this one is based on the US military flashlight.

 

     Flashlight, Military Krypton: This flashlight is in common use by special ops forces. It is very tough, and has a light 3 times as bright as a standard military flashlight.

 

     Flashlight, Mini Mag-Light: Popular flashlight carried instead of the normal flashlight by many US soldiers since it is every bit as bright as the angle flashlight. The light can be focused.  I carried one of these in the Army, as did many of my fellow soldiers, instead of the angle flashlight.

 

     Flashlight, Penlight: Issued to pilots and in field surgical kits.  Not especially bright, but enough for closeup work.

   

     Flashlight, TerraLUX 80 LED Aluminum Penlight: This is a bout the size of a penlight, but much brighter.  It has a clip for attachment to a pocket or gear.  It comes in gray, blue, orange, and white.  It only runs for 5 hours on two AAA batteries, but the LED bulb lasts for 25 years.

 

     Foam Sleeping Mat: This is a dense foam pad which is rolled up when carrying. This unfortunately acts as a sponge in wet weather, but smoothes out the bumps in rough ground.  Most troops consider it an unneeded luxury item and don’t carry one unless ordered to.

 

     Goggles: With interchangeable tinted/polarized and clear lenses.  Most are designed to allow only limited ventilation of the eye area, to keep dust out.

 

     HALO Rig: HALO stands for high-altitude, low-opening, and refers to a particular style of parachute drop. The parachutist leaves the plane at a great height (usually over 25,000 feet (7600m) -- high enough to require oxygen gear) and free-falls to a level below radar and visual observation height before opening. The HALO rig consists of a standard parachute, oxygen tank, face mask, insulated overgarment (it gets cold up that high) and altimeter.  Wt: 14 kg.  Price: $3500 (S/S).

 

     Hammock: Normal canvas hammock with wooden end stays.

 

     Hammock, Covered Jungle: A normal hammock with a canopy over the hammock and insect netting between the canopy and hammock.

 

     Hammock, Light Mesh: Supports 225kg, yet rolls into a fist-sized ball.

 

     HCP-1 (Health and Comfort Pack, Type 1): This is general issue in most Western and Middle Eastern military forces, and in lesser issue with Eastern military forces.  It is also common in disaster relief organizations.  Each HCP-1 is designed to equip 10 persons for 30 days.  The pack consists of 10 bags and 10 boxes.  Each bag contains a toothbrush, 2 tubes of toothpaste, 100 meters of dental floss, 10 disposable double-bladed razors, 2 cans of shaving cream, 3 bars of soap, a large container of foot powder, 20 moist towlettes (the large size), a bottle of hair shampoo, two sticks of deodorant, 5 ball-point pens, and a jar of petroleum jelly. The box contains a box of laundry detergent, 4 rolls of toilet paper, a comb, a small sewing kit, fingernail clippers, a hairbrush, a small mirror, a bottle of hair conditioner, a tin of shoe polish, another box of 50 moist towelettes, shaving gel (for female legs and underarms, but may also be used for faces), a writing tablet with 100 sheets of paper, a tweezers, a box of Bandaids, electric shave lotion, a bottle of hand lotion, a bottle of mink oil, 4 bottles of sunscreen, 3 sets of boot laces, a box of 50 envelopes, 3 nail files, a shoe polishing brush, 4 hair nets, another jar of petroleum jelly, and shave powder.  These items are packed in a crate.  The HCP-1 is based on a US Issue item, but other countries may have similar kits.

 

     HCP-2 (Health and Comfort Pack, Type 2):  This is an additional HCP designed for female military personnel and refugees.  Like the HCP-1, it is designed for 10 persons for 30 days.  The HCP-2 comes in a box and contains the following items: 48 regular sanitary napkins, 72 heavy sanitary napkins, 60 regular tampons, 84 heavy tampons, 250 panty shields, 400 moist towlettes, 20 4.55-liter self-seal plastic bags, 150 76x178mm plastic bags, 10 68-liter plastic garbage bags, 10 ponytail holders, 1 hairbrush, 2 plastic combs, 50 bobby pins, and 10 personal hygiene body wipes (large versions of the moist towelette, with an additional deodorizer).  The HCP-2 is based on a US Issue item, but other countries may have similar kits.

 

     Life Jacket: Buoys wearer's weight, plus the weight of the jacket, and 10kg. Reduces difficulty of Swimming rolls by one level for purposes of staying afloat.  Usually made of foam rubber encased in thicker rubber, or sometimes cork encased in cloth.

 

     Load-Bearing Equipment/Special Patrolling Insertion-Extraction (LBE/SPIE) System:  A modular combat webbing system capable of carrying an individual’s combat-essential equipment while enhancing the capability to quickly and easily conduct rappelling insertions and SPIE operations.  Essentially combines LBE suspenders or chest rig, pistol belt and rappelling harness into one.  Combat webbing accessories may be used with this system; pretty much, anything you can attach to an LBE-type rig, you can attach to this.

 

     Mess Kit: A metal tray to cook food, plus a fork, knife, and spoon.  The tray has three compartments, and a cover that also serves as a compartment. The central locking flat doubles as a handle so that the kit can be used to head foods over an open fire or on a heater.

 

     MOLLE Load-Bearing System:  New issue to US forces at the start of the war, the MOLLE system consists of a load-bearing vest and pack combination connected by a special ball-and-socket that allows the pack to be dropped in less than one combat phase.  The load-bearing vest (LBV) has different pouch attachments for each weapons specialist, though all have an integral belt and harness system and small removable butt pack (carries 3 kg).  The pack with integral frame can carry 40 kg of goodies, and also has the following:  a SINGARS radio pocket, a claymore mine pocket that contains several extra buckles and a six-magazine bandolier, a removable pouch on each side, a sleeping bag cover, and a 2-liter pressurized water bladder with a drinking hose.  In addition to this, a special combat patrol pack, which is really just a small backpack, can be attached to the back for another 10 kg of supplies. Similar setups are worn by other countries’ armed forces. The MOLLE system has retained some backward compatibility and most ALICE and other countries older equivalents may attach to the MOLLE or its equivalent.

     The LBV may be set up as follows:

     Rifleman:  Six 30-round magazine pouches (three magazines each), two hand grenade pouches (2 grenades each), and one 100-round/utility pouch.

     Grenadier:  Four 30-round magazine pouches, 20 40mm grenade pouches, four 40mm ILLUM pouches, one 100/round/utility pouch.

     SAW Gunner:  Two 30-round magazine pouches, two 200-round belt pouches, three 100 round/utility pouches.

     Medic:  Three 30-round magazine pouches, one hand grenade pouch, one medical bag (4 kg capacity).

     Shotgunner:  12 shotgun shell pouches or one 4-round magazine pouch (two per pouch), three 100-round/utility pouches, 4 hand grenade pouches.

     XM25 Gunner:  Eight 8-round 25mm magazine pouches, one 100-round/utility pouch.

 

     Pack, ALICE, Medium: Standard US field pack. Carries 25kg, including 3 external pockets which carry 10kg of the total volume.  (Most soldiers will put an MRE in one of them.)

 

     Pack, ALICE, Large: Larger version of the above; typically issued only to infantry, armor, artillery, and Special Forces personnel. I quickly invested in one of these shortly after getting to Ft. Stewart.  Carries 40kg, including 3 external pockets which hold 16kg of the total volume, and 3 other small pockets for miscellaneous items which close with snaps.

 

     Pack, Civilian: Usually zippered and normally not waterproof or only nominally waterproof. Different packs vary widely in arrangement of external or internal pockets (if any). This is the sort of pack you would give your child to carry his schoolbooks. Holds 10kg.  Though not much good for a soldier’s normal load, they are a perfect size for packaging satchel charges.

 

     Pack, Generic: A rucksack capable of carrying 30kg. They vary widely in form and construction.

 

     Pack, Locopack System: Combat pack designed for use by NATO special ops forces. Locopack is a modular system with a main pack holding 20kg, 0.2kg each in two shoulder pockets, and two detachable side pockets holding 4 kg each. (These side pockets can also be attached to ALICE webbing or combat vests.) Locopack also has an integral combat webbing set which includes two canteens, a personal medical kit pouch, and two magazine pouches (3 rifle magazines each), as well as two pouches holding 1.8kg each. Any part of the Locopack can be quick disconnected from any other.  Weight: (complete pack) 4.1kg (main pack) 1.2kg (each side pocket) 0.2kg (combat webbing) 2kg (shoulder pouches/side belt pouches, each) 0.1kg

 

     Pack, LRRP: Another alternate field pack, designed for long-range reconnaissance troops.  Holds 27kg in the main pack and 4 kg in each of two quick-release side pouches.  Weight: (complete pack) 2kg (main pack) 1.5kg (side pouch) 0.25kg each

 

     Pack, ShadowPack System: A common alternative field pack (known by different names in different countries. ShadowPack has a main pack holding 10.5 kg, two quick-release side pouches holding 2.5kg each, one back pouch holding 2kg, and one buttpack, holding 4.5kg.  Each pouch can be quick-released from the others and attached to standard load-carrying harness.  Weight: (complete) 2kg (main pack) 0.8kg (side pouch) 0.25kg (back pouch) 0.2kg (buttpack) 0.6kg

 

     Pack, Voltaic Systems OffGrid Solar Backpack:  This is essentially a standard sort of backpack, with a main compartment, an outer pocket, and two small side pockets, as well as small open pockets inside the main pack for organization. It has a total volume (between the main pack, outer pockets, and inner pockets) of 24581 cubic centimeters.  The difference comes built on to the outer pocket; it is a solar panel that can supply up to 12 watts of power, enough to charge or power small devices.  One hour (even on a cloudy day) in the sun or under a decent lightbulb will give the small battery a full charge that lasts six hours.  The full dimensions of this pack are about 46x30.5x20.3 centimeters.  It is more expensive and heavier than typical packs of its size due to the solar setup, but otherwise has as much utility, being built stronger than Mil-Spec requirements.  Access to the compartments is by zippers, except for the small pockets inside the main pack.

 

     Parachute: A device that allows a character to leap from a perfectly good aircraft; and probably reach the ground intact. Includes main canopy, reserve canopy, and all necessary harnesses. If recovered, the parachute can be repacked and reused. A character may carry up to four times his normal load during a parachute drop (note, however, that he may not be able to carry it far on the ground).

 

     Paraglider (Steerable Parachute): A special form of parachute permitting the passenger to direct his descent more than is possible with a normal parachute. If recovered, the paraglider can be repacked and reused.  The reserve chute for this is a standard parachute.

 

     Personal Commode:  Known as a PC by the troops, these were first issued to Coalition troops during Desert Shield.  It consists of a heavy, corrugated cardboard seat covered by a vinyl shell.  The PC is, amazingly, capable of supporting 545 kilograms.  One uses it by digging a slit trench or hole and then putting the PC above it. One of the secondary uses is as a seat on hot desert sands.  The PC folds down to a package of only 0.45kg.  An optional add-on is a privacy cover in the form of a waterproof tent to pull over the PC.  This weighs 1 kg.  If the user is careful, the PC may be re-used many times.

 

     Radio Pouch: Designed to hold the 2km radio, but can also hold a transponder. Can be clipped to the combat webbing.

 

     Rappelling Gear: Includes a "Swiss Seat" harness, 4 carabiners, and one pair of work gloves.

 

     Sewing Kit: A small folding leather or plastic pouch containing four needles, four pins, a needle threader, and 10 meters each of white, brown, OD Green, and black. It is assumed that the PC knows how to sew at least enough to make repairs to uniforms.  It folds into a very small package.

 

     Shelter Half, Canvas: A waterproofed canvas sheet that can be combined with another shelter half to form a two-man tent or alone as a one man tarp or lean-to. Includes pegs, poles, and rope.

 

     Shoulder Holster: This type of holster is specially designed to be worn under a jacket or loose shirt, holding the weapon against the body for concealment. It only works for pistols and SMGs with a bulk of 2 or less—weapons of bulk 3 can be concealed under a long coat, but shoulder-holsters aren't made for them. Weapons of bulk 4 or more can't be concealed.  The harness provides space for the weapon and two extra magazines/speedloaders. Wearing a shoulder holster makes the detection task one level more difficult.

 

     Signal Mirror: This mirror is designed for signaling aircraft or over long distances; may soldiers also use them to communicate using Morse code or predetermined signals.  Many soldiers also use them when putting them on and taking off camouflage paint, and others use them when attending to certain personal needs.  It is light and easy to store (I stored mine on the side of my magazines in a magazine pouch). A minor use is in starting fires, something it is only fair at doing (DIF: Survival). The signal mirror is mostly blank, but in the middle has a sight/eyehole to aim the mirror and locate the optimal angle between the sun and target. A typical signal mirror is 51x76mm.

 

     Small Concealed Holster: A holster designed to hold a pistol of bulk 0 in a concealed position (fastened around an ankle, clipped to a waist belt or brassiere, etc.). These holsters only hold the weapon, not extra magazines/speedloaders. Wearing a small-concealed holster makes the detection task two levels more difficult.

 

     Snorkel Gear: A mask, snorkel, and swim fins, permitting character to swim completely underwater for periods of up to 4xCON seconds, with a minimum of surface interaction (pulling the snorkel below the surface and holding his breath). The character need only gently break the surface and can then breathe normally without making great amounts of noise or surface ripples. Spotting is done normally for characters on the surface, but characters swimming underwater are two levels more difficult.

 

     Solar Light Cap: This is a hat (usually a baseball-type cap, though others are available) that has a solar panel built into the brim, and two lights on the front corners of the brim.  This allows the wearer to work at night, on a vehicle, lighting a fire, digging through his gear, for example.  The LED lights have a sliding switch on one corner behind one of the lights that allows the wearer to kick the lights up to full brightness (about as bright as a Maglite), or taken down to a soft glow.  On full brightness, a charge will last for five hours; on the lowest light setting, the light will last for 36 hours.  (The GM will have to estimate when the player varies the light used.) about an hour and a half are needed to develop a full charge, under sunlight, light clouds, or a decent lightbulb or lantern.

 

     Strobe Light: A powerful flashing Xenon light used as a distress signal. Pilots are issued one of these, and they are commonly carried by other soldiers (I carried one, and it became useful more than once). From the air they are visible at a range of 15km during the day and 50km at night. The strobe will flash continuously for 9 hours.

 

     Sunglasses, Polarized: You can get issue sunglasses in some situations, or go off the deep end and buy designer sunglasses. For game purposes, they function identically.

 

     Survival Kit: Contains a wide variety of useful items in a high-impact plastic container that can double as a 0.7-liter canteen.

          2-man Emergency Tent                                        Signal Mirror

          High-Pitch Whistle                                                3 Band-Aids (assorted)

          2 Gauze Pads (100x100mm)                                 3 butterfly Band-Aids (assorted)

          4 units mild pain-reliever                                       1 candle

          2 small flares                                                       50 waterproof matches

          6m nylon cord                                                      0.5m wire

          50mmx1m duct tape                                             1 razor blade

          1 zip-lock bag                                                      1 safety pin

          1x1m aluminum foil                                              2 energy bars (1/2 day food)

          5 dextrose cubes (1/4 day food)                           2 salt packets

          3 bouillon cubes                                                   3 tea bags

     The kit also contains 4 laminated cards containing survival tips that give the user a default skill of Survival 1 when trying to find food or make an expedient shelter. In the T2K timeline, there was a massive run on these kits in the last few weeks before nuclear strikes began. 

 

     Survival Kit, Aviator's: Though the Special Operations Kit was often acquired by aircrews, this kit was the official issue for NATO aircrews.

          3-blade pocket knife                                             1 water bag (1-liter)

          6m steel wire                                                        10 waterproof matches

          2 striker strips                                                      3 fishhooks

          1 button compass                                    2 large needles

          4 magnesium fire starters                                     10m fishing line

          2 energy bars (1/2 day food)

 

     Survival Kit, Special Operations: Unlike the above kit, this kit was primarily issued to LRSU teams, special operations units, and aviators. It is packaged in an aluminum tin, which can also serve as a cup or cooking pot.

          Signal mirror                                                        Hacksaw blade

          Lanyard saw                                                        50 waterproof matches

          Flint and steel                                                      1-liter water bag

          3 fishhooks                                                         2 razors

          10 Band-Aids (assorted)                                       4 gauze pads (100x100mm)

          20 salt tablets                                                      10 units mild pain-reliever

          1 high-intensity chemlight                                     Notepaper and pencil

          50mmx2m duct tape                                             1 Pair tweezers

          1 candle                                                              3m snare line

          10m fishing line                                                    Button compass

          4 large Band-Aids (assorted)                                3 safety pins

          5 units +/- antibiotic                                              1 roll medical tape (25mmx5m)

          1 flare                                                                  2 energy bars (1/2 day food)

          1 Sharpening stone                                              20m nylon cord

     The kit also comes with a set of survival tips, but these were rarely used by the units to which the kits were issued (they already knew the information).

 

     Survival Knife: Knife with hollow handle to store survival gear. The knife is not properly balanced for throwing (FOR:Thrown Weapon), but the butt can be used as a hammer. The blade is tool grade and not what is normally considered weapon grade, but still useful in a fight.  In addition to the supplies listed below, 0.1kg of other gear can be carried in the handle.

          Lanyard Saw                                                        5m Thread

          3 Fishhooks                                                         6 Waterproof Matches

          1 Sharpening Stone                                             3m Snare Wire

          10m Fishing Line                                                  2 Needles

          Button Compass

 

     Tarp: Waterproof heavy canvas, often issued with vehicles.  This tarp is 2x3 meters, but many other sizes are available. Weight: 5kg; Price: $16 (V/V)

 

     Tent, 1-Man: A small oval tent, typically made of Gore-Tex or waterproofed nylon.  It is just big enough for a soldier and his immediate gear and rucksack, though conceivably the gear could be left outside and two men crammed inside. Includes pegs and stays.

 

     Toilet Paper: Paper of the kind you’d find in a public restroom or military latrine, and not something like Charmin or Cottonelle. One roll of normal size (not a double roll or triple roll).

 

     Vest, ALICE:  This simply a canvas vest with 30 attaching loops on the front and back for gear that clips on with standard clips. It replaces the standard LCE harness, and is more comfortable and quiet than the standard harness, as well as allowing for more individual preference in arranging equipment.

 

     Vest, Battle:  This is an LCE originally developed for Israeli Defense Forces and since adopted worldwide by police and military forces. It consists of a canvass harness with 4 rifle magazine pouches (2 magazines each), 3 grenade pouches, personal medical kit pouch, 1-liter canteen and pouch, 1 buttpack, 1 knife/bayonet sheath, and 4 miscellaneous attachment points. A sore point among soldiers is that the pouches close with Velcro strips, which can become painfully loud when someone is trying to be quiet.

 

     Vest, Commando: This vest was developed for IDF special operations forces, and has since been adopted by special forces worldwide.  It consists of an adjustable canvas vest with a holster and pistol magazine pouch, knife/bayonet sheath, personal medical kit pouch, 2km radio pouch (plus a microphone and cord holder on the front of the vest), 2 rifle magazine pouches (4 magazines each), 1 grenade pouch (2 grenades), 1 buttpack, 1 canteen and pouch, 4 shotshell loops, and one miscellaneous pocket and 4 miscellaneous attachment points. This vest has the problem with Velcro closures.

 

     Vest, Fishing:  These vests have been widely pressed into use as combat vests by civilians and militia forces. A typical vest (for game purposes) has 11 large and 14 small pockets (typically zippered, both inside and out and can hold up to 12kg of gear. A person might not find his gear as easily accessible as he would in a military vest.

 

     Vest, Pilot’s Survival: This is also used by US armor crews (a similar vest is worn by NATO armor crews).  It is a nylon mesh vest with 3 large and 3 small zippered pouches on the chest, a holster (merely enough to hold the pistol in place, not to protect it from the elements), a knife/bayonet sheath, and four small and one large miscellaneous attachment point. Two more pockets are found on the inside of the vest. The vest comes in five sizes.  It can hold 6.2 kg.

 

     Watch, Military: Simple watch with a luminous dial and an easy-to read hands and numbers. Watches such as these are typically issued by the unit as team leader level and above.  They are tough and designed to take a great deal of abuse.

 

     Waterproof Bag: This is generally used to keep items within a rucksack or duffel bag dry, and they hold 10 kg.  A little trick most soldiers know is to take an extra bag when deploying to cold climates; you slip the waterproof bag over the end of your sleeping bag and it will keep your feet and legs warm.

 

     Water Purification Tablets:     These are small tablets, and generally two or more are required to purify water to a point where it is safe to drink.  It does this by neutralizing harmful minerals and killing harmful insects, larvae, and other wildlife that may be in the water you just picked up.  They are generally based on iodide, which leaves an extremely foul taste (a strongly metallic taste) in the water, though it is safe to drink.  A 1-liter canteen may take two tablets, while a 5-liter canteen might require ten or more.  The water is generally swished around in the container; the tablets dissolve in the water and need to be thoroughly mixed with the water.

 

     Wet Wipes: This is a simple (usually) sealed package of cloth/paper wipes impregnated with soap and a light amount of water.  It is not enough water to wet something else, but is useful for general cleaning and washing of the body.

 

Item

Weight

Volume

Protects Against (Degrees F)

Price

Assault Suit

8 kg

Heavy

10

$4100

Body Veil, Camouflage

1 kg

Light

5

$100

Brass Catcher (Plastic)

1 kg

Medium

NA

$15

Brass Catcher (Cloth)

0.5 kg

Medium

NA

$5

Can Opener, P38

0

None

NA

$1

Canteen, 1-Liter

0.1 kg

Light

NA

$10

Canteen, 2-Liter Reserve

0.2 kg

Light

NA

$25

Canteen, 5-:Liter Reserve

0.4 kg

Light

NA

$50

CLSP

25 kg

Huge

NA

$5000

Clothing, Civilian

2-10 kg

Light-Large

5-20

$50-500 or More

Combat Webbing

2.52 kg

Large

NA

$218

Combat Webbing, Suspenders & Belt

0.77 kg

Light

NA

$22

Combat Webbing, Butt Pack

0.2 kg

Light

NA

$13

Combat Webbing, 1-Liter Canteen & Pouch

0.25 kg

Light

NA

$20

Combat Webbing, Magazine Pouch, Pistol

0.08 kg

Light

NA

$6

Combat Webbing, Magazine Pouch, Rifle

0.2 kg

Light

NA

$9

Combat Webbing, Pouch, Shotshell

0.08 kg

Light

NA

$8

Combat Webbing, Holster

0.28 kg

Light

NA

$14

Combat Webbing, Canteen Cup

0.25 kg

Light

NA

$10

Combat Webbing, Personal Medical Kit

0.6 kg

Light

NA

$200

Combat Webbing, Utility Box

0.15 kg

Light

NA

$5

Combat Webbing, Utility Pouch, Small

0.08 kg

Light

NA

$3

Combat Webbing, Utility Pouch, Large

0.1 kg

Light

NA

$4

Cot, Folding

5.5 kg

Heavy

NA

$40

Cot, Light Folding

3.2 kg

Heavy

NA

$62

Duffel Bag

1.5 kg

Medium

NA

$23

Filter Straw (Package)

0.5 kg

Light

NA

$17

Flashlight, “4-Battery”

1.05 kg

Light

NA

$40

Flashlight, Krypton

0.14 kg

Light

NA

$30

Flashlight, Military

0.3 kg

Light

NA

$12

Flashlight, Military Krypton

0.3 kg

Light

NA

$45

Flashlight, Mini-Maglite

0,17 kg

Light

NA

$22

Flashlight, Penlight

0.08 kg

Light

NA

$13

Flashlight, TerraLUX LightStar 80

0.06 kg

Light

NA

$19

Foam Sleeping Mat

0.5 kg

Large

NA

$15

Goggles

0.05 kg

None

NA

$17

HALO Rig Parachute

14 kg

Heavy

NA

$3500

Hammock

0.7 kg

Medium

NA

$19

Hammock, Covered Jungle

1.25 kg

Medium

NA

$32

Hammock, Light Mesh

0.3 kg

Light

NA

$15

HCP-1

155 kg

Huge

NA

$1950

HCP-2

155 kg

Huge

NA

$1950

Life Jacket

6 kg

Large

10

$75

LBE/SPIE System

2 kg

Light

NA

$130

Mess Kit

0.4 kg

Medium

NA

$9

MOLLE LBS Shoulder Pack

3.84 kg

Medium

NA

$252

MOLLE LBS LBV

0.9 kg

Light

NA

$33

MOLLE LBS Butt Pack

0.2 kg

Light

NA

$19

MOLLE LBS Patrol Pack

0.67 kg

Medium

NA

$64

MOLLE LBS Rifle Magazine Pouch

0.2 kg

Light

NA

$10

MOLLE LBS Grenade Pouch

0.1 kg

Light

NA

$5

MOLLE LBS Utility Pouch

0.3 kg

Light

NA

$21

MOLLE LBS 40mm Grenade Pouch

0.5 kg

Light

NA

$25

MOLLE LBS 40mm ILLUM Grenade Pouch

0.1 kg

Light

NA

$5

MOLLE LBS SAW Belt Bag

1.33 kg

Light

NA

$67

MOLLE LBS Medical Kit

3.6 kg

Light

NA

$400

MOLLE LBS Shotgun Ammo Pouch

0.6 kg

Light

NA

$30

MOLLE LBS 25mm Grenade Pouch

1.2 kg

Light

NA

$60

Pack, ALICE, Medium

1.4 kg

Medium

NA

$50

Pack, ALICE, Large

2.2 kg

Medium

NA

$80

Pack, Civilian

0.5-1 kg

Medium

NA

$20

Pack, Generic

2 kg

Medium

NA

$50

Pack, Locopack System

4.1 kg

Large

NA

$325

Pack, LRRP

2 kg

Medium

NA

$200

Pack, ShadowPack System

2 kg

Medium

NA

$160

Pack, Voltaic Systems OffGrid Solar Backpack

3.2 kg

Large

NA

$230

Parachute, Standard

15 kg

Large

NA

$450

Paraglider (Steerable Parachute)

16 kg

Large

NA

$650

Personal Commode

0.45 kg

Medium

NA

$12

Personal Commode, Privacy Cover

1 kg

Small

NA

$50

Radio Pouch

0.1 kg

Small

NA

$10

Rappelling Gear

1.1 kg

Small

NA

$80

Sewing Kit

0

NA

NA

$10

Shelter Half, Canvas

1 kg

Small

40 (Two Halves)

$25

Shoulder Holster

1 kg

Small

NA

$50

Signal Mirror

0.3 kg

Small

NA

$12

Small Concealed Holster

0.3 kg

Small

NA

$25

Snorkel Gear

2 kg

Medium

NA

$120

Solar Light Cap

0.14 kg

None

NA

$40

Strobe Light

0.14 kg

Small

NA

$50

Sunglasses, Polarized

0

None

NA

$40-250

Survival Kit

0.5 kg

Small

NA

$40

Survival Kit, Aviators’

0.14 kg

Small

NA

$30

Survival Kit, Special Operations

0.3 kg

Small

NA

$150

Survival Knife

0.5 kg

Small

NA

$75

Tarp

5 kg

Large

NA

$16

Tent, 1-Man

1.3 kg

Medium

40

$60

Toilet Paper

0.6 kg

Small

NA

$10

Vest, ALICE

0.28 kg

Medium

3

$40

Vest, Battle

2.47 kg

Medium

3

$300

Vest, Commando

1.68 kg

Medium

3

$270

Vest, Fishing

2 kg

Medium

3

$30

Vest, Pilot’s Survival

0.62 kg

Small

2

$65

Watch, Military

0

None

NA

$20

Waterproof Bag

0.1 kg

Small

NA

$6

Water Purification Tablets

0.1 kg

None

NA

$6

Wet Wipes

0.25 kg

Small

NA

$4